Some useful Linux / *nix admin words of experience

August 21, 2008

Entitled “Lazy Linux: 10 essential tricks for admins“, this is a pretty good set of essential commands for *nix administrators.

If I have to suggest anything for in-depth study, it’s “Trick 6″: “Remote VNC session through an SSH tunnel”, because you can actually do just about anything through an SSH tunnel. If you’re faced with you -> firewall -> internet -> remotemachine -> internet -> restoftheworld, you can do whatever you like with “restof theworld” if you can ssh to “remotemachine”, whatever the local firewall thinks. And you can probably ssh over port 443 through the firewall. Hmm; maybe I should write this up properly at some point. I’m sure it’s well documented on the web if you look for it….


Book

April 23, 2008

A serious publisher has contacted me about writing a serious book about Linux shell programming.

It is all really very serious. I’m not used to being serious, as you can probably tell from the fact that I have now used the word “serious” four times in this three-sentence post.

I am rather keen to write a book on the subject, not because I’m vain, or desperate for money, but because the stuff I have seen out there in dead-tree format has been of rather low quality. Also because of all the emails I’ve received over the years, they have all been positive, and none has said anything along the lines of “I didn’t need any of that because I bought Book[X]”, or indeed any book. People have emailed me, asking for advice as to what book to buy, and I have been unable to recommend any book that I have seen.

So:

What would you like to see in your ideal book about UNIX / Linux shell scripting, be it Bourne, Bash, ksh, tcsh, zsh, whatever?

Please don’t be timid; if you want to know how to work out how many nose-flutes can be fitted into the area of a Boeing 757, you won’t be anything like as strange as some of the correspondants I’ve had over the years, so please, tell me what is bugging you, what has bugged you, or even what you think might be likely to bug you in days / months / years to come.

I’m likely to answer any specific questions here and now, whether or not they end up in the book, but anything you’d like to see in a book, too… post that here, and I’ll have a stab at it.

Also, I would of course be interested to know if you have found any useful books on or around the subject, and what they did particularly well.

Steve


Happy First Birthday!

January 6, 2008

This blog has now been running for a year; the first post was Hello World on 17th Jan 2007.

I hadn’t realised it had been going for so long; in that time, I’ve made 41 posts, so I haven’t quite managed to make one post per week :( I have been a bit slack lately, for which I do apologise. New Years Resolution: I must make more posts here!

In the meantime, my main site, steve-parker.org, has celebrated its seventh birthday, having been born in June 2000 – looking forward to making the 8th birthday celebrations this June!


Logic

September 7, 2007

Whilst not directly related to shell programming, understanding of basic logic operations – AND, OR, NOR, XOR, NAND, etc, are as important to shell programmers as to C, Java, .Net and other coders.

My recent interactive logic gate page seems to have become quite popular; it’s just a simple implementation of each of the major logic circuits in use. If you want to see more, say so – I’ll add anything you ask for ;-)


25 useful commands in Linux/UNIX for Beginners

August 22, 2007

The (often a bit geeky for this blog) FreeBSD-World website has a good “Top-25″ list of 25 useful commands in Linux/UNIX for Beginners (note: new URL updated 31 Aug 2008)

I’m not sure that #24 (dig) and #25 (host) are absolutely necessary, #18 (startx) is possibly outdated these days, and the compression tools (6-9) are much of a muchness, but apart from that, #1 – #23 should be familiar to anyone who claims to be experienced with UNIX/Linux. If somebody was missing one, it would have to be #18 (startx), as (a) it’s not needed on servers, and (b) modern *nix distros will boot into a GUI automatically when possible.

So what’s the list?
25. host
24. dig
23. mkdir
22. rm
21. cp
20. grep
19. ls
18. startx
17. nano / vi
16. pwd
15. cat
14. man
13. kill
12. locate
11. ifconfig
10. ssh
9. gzip
8. bzip2
7. zip
6. tar (I would put 6-9 in one category, personally. rar should probably be in there too)
5. mount
4. passwd
3. ping
2. tail
1. top


Shell Pitfalls

July 30, 2007

Greg Wooledge has an excellent list of Bash Pitfalls, with good explanations as to why they are wrong, and what the correct syntax should be.


Korn Shell Website

May 18, 2007

David Korn’s Korn shell (ksh) lives at http://www.kornshell.com/

I have to admit to a preference for the Bourne shell; partly because of the if/then/else syntax (what is “[[” all about?!), partly because /bin/sh is bourne (or compatible) on all traditional UNIX and Linux (where it’s bash) systems, but ksh is another good, solid shell. The source is also available from AT&T. It’s also a nice interactive shell, in the absence of bash.

There’s also a nice anecdotal story about David Korn – at a launch of Microsoft’s “Services for UNIX” (which actually provides UNIX-like services for Windows), I believe.

You can also see David Korn hanging with KoRn


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